Labour Migrant Works! The significance of labour migration for the Dutch economy and Dutch prosperity

Partners: VNO-NCW, MKB-Nederland, LTO Nederland
Publication date: February 2012

 

This publication takes a look at the significance of labour migration for the Dutch economy and Dutch prosperity. Labour migration raises questions for society and policymakers. The questions are legitimate. Are Dutch nationals driven out of jobs by foreigners who are cheaper? Why do we need foreigners when there are so many Dutch people without a job? Does the acceptance of foreign workers constitute an attack on our social security system? In a word, what do we actually get out of foreign workers and should we be cautious or generous about accepting foreign workers? The most important benchmark is whether or not our economy and our prosperity are served by labour migration. In this context, the perspective chosen is that of Dutch companies which determine demand on the labour market. That is an important perspective, because it is through Dutch companies that we must earn and maintain our prosperity. This publication has come into being in cooperation with VNO-NCW, MKB-Nederland, LTO Nederland, The Hague Process on Refugees and Migration (THP) and a number of companies established in the Netherlands.

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The Global Economic Crises and Migration – Where Do We Go From Here?

Author: Bimal Ghosh
Partner: International Organization for Migration (IOM)

Publication date: 2010

 

The corrosive effects of the Great Recession – the worst since the 1930s – on labour markets and workforces are now widely known. These, in turn, are driving changes in migration policies and patterns – changes that can significantly influence social peace, inter-state relations, and the pace of global economic recovery. Yet these migration issues have thus far received little attention, with recession-related policy debates and public discussions mostly focused on financial rules and reform.

Into this void comes Bimal Ghosh’s new book, jointly sponsored by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and The Hague Process on Refugees and Migration, which bridges the policy gap and offers a fresh outlook on the future of migration. In exploring the recession’s impact on migration policies and patterns, Professor Ghosh examines the decline in economic growth – including international trade, capital flows, development aid, and remittances – and analyses its links to joblessness and incomes, poverty and inequality, and changes in the labour force.

The discussion draws on experiences of past recessions showing that job-market recovery takes longer than economic recovery. He then examines how these trends – and government reactions to them in both rich and poor countries – have been influencing migration overall.

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